Psycho (1960) 
Dir. by Alfred Hitchcock

(Source: paintdeath)


Alain Delon in Le Samourai (1967) dir. Jean-Pierre Melville

(Source: violentsaturdays)



The Shining (1980)

The Shining (1980)

(Source: verticalfilm)


(Source: catsinthebelfry)



Max Von Sydow in The Seventh Seal (1957) dir. Ingmar Bergman

Max Von Sydow in The Seventh Seal (1957) dir. Ingmar Bergman

(Source: verticalfilm)



The Art of David Lynch

The Art of David Lynch

(Source: thedayistoday)


Midnight in Paris (2011)


cinephiliabeyond:

As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster, said Ray Liotta, and the rest has become legend. Martin Scorsese’s 1990 crime film Goodfellas gloriously depicts the rise and fall of Henry Hill, a young man infatuated with the image of gangsters, in a film Roger Ebert dubbed the finest film about organized crime ever made. Mind you, Ebert had definitely seen The Godfather. An adaptation of co-writer Nicholas Pileggi’s 1986 non-fiction book Wiseguy, Scorsese’s film brings out the very best out of a pool of talent made of such giants as De Niro, Pesci and Liotta. Certainly one of the iconic films of the nineties, Goodfellas remains an epitome of gangster films and one of Scorsese’s finest to date. Take a peek at Scorsese and Pileggi’s script that swept legendary director Michael Powell off his feet, as well as numerous outtakes and a historically enlightening PBS American Masters documentary that unearthed some priceless behind-the-scenes material. Goodfellas is what makes cinema so great—the ABCs of adept filmmaking, the sheer power of storytelling, the unique magic that makes you fall in love with characters that are far from deserving such affection. Goodfellas is divine and Scorsese is our god.
1-Page Film School: Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas

cinephiliabeyond:

As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster, said Ray Liotta, and the rest has become legend. Martin Scorsese’s 1990 crime film Goodfellas gloriously depicts the rise and fall of Henry Hill, a young man infatuated with the image of gangsters, in a film Roger Ebert dubbed the finest film about organized crime ever made. Mind you, Ebert had definitely seen The Godfather. An adaptation of co-writer Nicholas Pileggi’s 1986 non-fiction book Wiseguy, Scorsese’s film brings out the very best out of a pool of talent made of such giants as De Niro, Pesci and Liotta. Certainly one of the iconic films of the nineties, Goodfellas remains an epitome of gangster films and one of Scorsese’s finest to date. Take a peek at Scorsese and Pileggi’s script that swept legendary director Michael Powell off his feet, as well as numerous outtakes and a historically enlightening PBS American Masters documentary that unearthed some priceless behind-the-scenes material. Goodfellas is what makes cinema so great—the ABCs of adept filmmaking, the sheer power of storytelling, the unique magic that makes you fall in love with characters that are far from deserving such affection. Goodfellas is divine and Scorsese is our god.

1-Page Film School: Martin Scorsese’s Goodfellas


 I am the Third Revelation! I am who the Lord has chosen!

(Source: cyberqueer)



vintagegal:

"It had been a wonderful evening and what I needed now to give it the perfect ending was a bit of the old Ludwig van."

A Clockwork Orange (1971)


(Source: missavagardner)


bcollis:

Bruce Willis and Maria De Medeiros in Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction

bcollis:

Bruce Willis and Maria De Medeiros in Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction


(Source: trashmisfit)



Snow Grey Glitter Pointer